Assessment Education Perspectives

Oregon Unveils Report on the Ideal Assessment System

“This new proposed system of assessment will increase time for learning, emphasize the use of assessment in support of learning, and rely on the most authentic balance of assessments to encourage student success.”

A New Path for Oregon: System of Assessment to Empower Meaningful Student Learning

At the behest of the Governor, a diverse group of educators has created and unveiled a report on the “ideal” assessment system for the state of Oregon.  The plan articulates that assessment should support the learning of all types of students and provides a call to action for educators and leaders in Oregon to re-evaluate its current assessment system. The final report in its entirety – A New Path for Oregon: System of Assessment to Empower Meaningful Student Learning – can be found here.

The process for establishing this vision began with a group of teachers sharing their ideas and values on assessment. A larger group of stakeholders was then tasked with proposing a system of assessment which makes sense for students, families, and educators. Their work was guided by Rick Stiggins, one of our advisors here at AssessmentLiteracy.org.

A key finding of the group is that assessment of learning and assessment for learning should be balanced. The report also notes that different education stakeholders need data provided by different types of assessments to inform their decision making. The plan is ultimately a call to action for the state of Oregon to move away from its history of over-emphasis on summative assessment. And, as we advocate here on our site, the Oregon report found that assessment literacy for educators is essential to implementing this new, balanced system of assessment.

AssessmentLiteracy.org can serve as a repository for these types of state assessment plans. As different states release these reports, we will share them here in our Library section. If you have links of interest on state assessment reviews, please share them with us on Facebook or Twitter (@Assess2Learn).

A.L.